Community, History, Landmarks, Local

Sixty Years of Pulling Strings at Fairyland

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I have a deep level of admiration for those who entertain children for a living.  Play isn’t something that comes naturally to me.  When I watch jugglers, magicians, balloon artists and other performers at birthday parties and events, I am in awe.  To take oneself to the level of a child may be “down” in the physical sense, but it actually requires one to move “up” in the sense of energy, creativity, and imagination.  Puppeteers have always fascinated me in the ways they combine a piece of art, their hands, and their voices to create a character that will cause little eyes to open wide.  While digital animation has taken over much of children’s entertainment in the 21st Century, iconic puppets still dance across our screens in long running shows such as Sesame Street.  Yet there are few places where you can still watch a curtain move aside and see lively characters dance in front of your eyes.  Oakland’s own Children’s Fairyland is one of those special spots.  Along the shore of Lake Merritt, Fairyland has been home to our country’s longest running live puppet theater.  Now celebrating sixty years, the Storybook Theater at Fairyland, and its dedicated director, invited me behind the scenes to see just how it has been pulling strings for so long.

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Community, History, Local

OMCA Encourages Thought…How to Keep “There There”

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When Gertrude Stein coined the phrase, “there is no there there” in relation to her childhood home, little did she know that it would have a renaissance in the Oakland of the 21st Century.  While some feel the statement was a negative comment about our city, what she really was speaking to was change.  The Oakland of her youth was gone, her version of “there” was gone; a new place was now there and it was unfamiliar.  Cities change.  They shrink and grow.  They struggle and flourish.  They crumble and build.  Often, these things happen at the same time; a confusing dichotomy of positive and negative that is hard to understand.  As I sat down to write this I remembered that I had touched on Oakland’s current climate in my very first post so I decided to go back and re-read exactly what I had written:

“I don’t intend to use this as a platform to jump in on that debate; but I do hope that I can use this site as a vehicle to not only share some of the amazing spaces and places that are planting new roots in Oakland, but to also occasionally highlight our city’s history, communities, and people. Will see how I do.”

When I look at that statement almost a year later, I feel a couple things.  While I still feel I am not qualified to be on a platform, I do feel that I have a responsibility.  I feel that since I have become a more visible member of the community it is my duty to share, to help educate, to give people something to think about.  The Oakland Museum of California is doing the same thing.  Their new exhibit, “Oakland, I want you to know…” is thought provoking, inspiring, upsetting, and hopeful.  It is an invitation to our community, a challenge, to fight to keep our “there there.”  As a member of the community I experienced all of those emotions when I spent time viewing it a couple of weeks ago.

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History

London’s Lens and Tropical Tales

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When I think of Jack London, I typically think of the snowy Klondike, sled dogs, and a little log cabin by the Oakland Estuary.  It is just recently that I learned more about his love for the rolling hills of the Sonoma countryside and his dedication to his land and property in Glen Ellen.  Yet Jack London…surfer?  This was news to me.  When a fellow Oaklander gave me the idea to look into Jack London’s South Pacific travels, I was intrigued.  I started to read about his love of adventure and sailing.  I learned more about his interest in South Pacific cultures; his desire to build the perfect vessel to sail around the world.  In fact, I have learned quite a bit about Jack London recently.  While inspired to share more over time, it is his taste for the tropics that I have chosen to focus on as our Bay Area summer has turned mild.  I dug around a bit and was connected to a source for images from Jack London’s personal photo albums.  An amateur photographer, London often carried a camera and was passionate about documenting his experiences.  It is clear that his cameras often traded hands as he moved from capturer to subject.  As I skimmed through picture after picture of his travels through the islands it was clear to me that even over 100 years ago, the lure of the tropics was too much to resist.

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History, Local, Recipes & Tips, Restaurants & Drink

Tropical Dreamin’…A One-Legged Trader and the Mai Tai

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The tropics. White sand meets picturesque blue water. Palm trees heavy with coconuts, fields of sugar cane, sweet tropical fruit. A lack of seasons means flip-flops year round; a golden tan that never truly fades. So many of us daydream of a tropical island as our permanent home. There was a time in my life when I thought I was meant to be an islander; I was twenty. A year spent abroad on the shores of Australia had me convinced it was the way I was meant to live. Twenty years later as I approach forty, with two kids and a mortgage, it’s a daydream I sometimes still revisit; a “what if” that creeps in when days are long.  As the depth of summer sends images of tropical locations across my social media feeds, I have been thinking about ways to bring its allure into my own life. What happened is I discovered the ways a couple of iconic Oakland names went after their own tropical dreams; the first of which was a man with a wooden leg who turned his Oakland watering hole into a Polynesian-themed empire.

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Momma, Travel

Ten Minute Moments…Sierra Style

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To use the word “vacation” when traveling with small children is a bit of a stretch.  As a good friend once shared, the word “trip” is a better adjective to describe a getaway with little ones in tow.  Long gone are the days of a suitcase full of books, hours of solitude in the sun, leisurely dinners, endless cocktails with no concern for what may follow in the morning; another day of laziness awaits.  As I type the words I even sigh and daydream of a time that once was.  A certain mindset is needed when you enter into a trip with a 2-year-old and a 4-year-old; deep breaths are involved.  Parenting challenges can become all the more challenging when you alter their routines.  While exciting adventures and beautiful spots may await, sometimes young kids could care less.  Last week, to celebrate my daughter’s second birthday, my family and I spent seven days in a rustic cabin on the hillside above Fallen Leaf Lake, just west of Lake Tahoe’s southern shores.  I coined the phrase “ten minute moment” a couple of days in, as I shared with my husband my approach to finding relaxation and joy in days that still required the patience I often struggle with at home.  I was determined to grab as many of them as I could.  It’s advice that I think can hold true to anyone, anytime, anywhere.

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Community, History, Landmarks, Local

Woodminster & Fifty Years of Music Under The Stars

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“High on the summit of Oakland’s eastern skyline a Woodland Open-Air Theater and Temple of Honor, reached by a gigantic stairway and surrounded by a grove of huge Sequoia trees, are being constructed to commemorate great California authors of the past and of the future, who among their writings heralded to the world the scenic beauties and the historic life of our superb State.”

Gertrude Mott, 1936

I have become sentimental about Woodminster.  Odd, given that until five days ago I had never set foot inside its gates.  Something about how this place came to be, and how it has become a second home to a family that has been producing musicals inside its open-air bowl for fifty years, has captivated me.  It’s a place that was built amidst depression; a “cathedral in the woods” to honor California writers.  Its early advocates had high hopes for its use; festivals in honor of California literature, educational programs for East Bay schools and civic organizations, and of course large theatrical and musical performances.  World War II caused the lights to be turned off for the first few years of its existence and the rise of the television caused interest to wane in the middle of the century.  However, for the past fifty years the summer musical program has endured thanks to a husband and wife team that brought innovation, passion, and family-filled exuberance to this special spot in Oakland’s woods.

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Food, Local, Recipes & Tips, Retail

A Nod To Pollinators & Urban Farms with Honey Lemonade

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It’s National Pollinator Week and I just read an amazing fact; one third of all agricultural output in the United States relies on pollinators.  Isn’t that unbelievable?  Without the help of pollinators worldwide, such as bees, butterflies, and birds, we wouldn’t have coffee.  Or chocolate.  Or tequila!  It’s funny, my husband’s favorite beer is Pliny the Elder, an IPA named after the famous Roman naturalist and produced by Russian River Brewing Company.  I therefore find it ironic that as I read about pollination today I came across a quote by Pliny the Elder, “Nature is to be found in her entirety nowhere more than in her smallest creatures.”  Its profound and true.  Seventy-five percent of all of the plants on Earth rely on pollinators.  Yet as industry, population, and pollution increase, their colonies are being threatened and destroyed at a disturbing rate.  Its something to think about as you watch a bee buzz from flower to flower.  I chose to honor pollinators this week in my own way; a trip to our local urban farming store for a jar of their honey, produced by their own honey bees.  A day later I have a pitcher of honey lemonade to enjoy on this perfect summer weekend.

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Community, Local, Restaurants & Drink, Walks & Hikes

My Top Ten Things to Do in Oakland this Summer

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Hello Summer!  Warm Days.  Long Nights.  The smell of the BBQ.  Eating outside.  Fingers sticky with watermelon; or an ice cream cone.  There are so many things about the hottest of seasons that make memories so fond.  Just last night my daughter and I enjoyed the longest day of the year taking a walk in flip-flops, picking blackberries, returning home to enjoy ice cream and slices of stone fruit pie on the back porch.  As you look forward to these next couple of months, before Labor Day unofficially draws this time of year to a close, consider any one of the below as a great way to enjoy summertime right here in The Town.  I know I will be crossing many of them off my own list, and hope to create lots more memories for the bank.

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